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  1. Oil and Gas: Judge denies request to halt Dakota Access pipeline work

      WASHINGTON (AP) — A federal judge on Monday refused to stop construction on the last stretch of the Dakota Access pipeline , which is progressing much faster than expected and could be operational in as little as 30 days. U.S. District Judge James Boasberg ruled after an hourlong hearing that as long as oil isn't flowing through the pipeline, there is no imminent harm to the Cheyenne River and Standing Rock Sioux tribes, which are suing to stop the project. But he said he'd consider the arguments more thoroughly at another hearing on Feb. 27. That gives the tribes hope that they still might prevail, Cheyenne River Chairman Harold Frazier said. "To put that pipeline in the ground would be irreparable harm for us in our culture," he said. The tribes requested the temporary injunction last week after Texas-based Energy Transfer Partners got federal permission to lay pipe under a Missouri River reservoir in North Dakota. That's the last big section of the $3.8 billion pipeline, which would carry oil from North Dakota to Illinois. The tribes say the pipeline would endanger their cultural sites and water supply. They added a religious freedom component to their case last week by arguing that clean water is necessary to practice the Sioux religion. "The mere presence of the oil in the pipeline renders the water spiritually impure," said Nicole Ducheneaux, lawyer for the Cheyenne River Sioux tribe. But Boasberg said any immediate harm to the tribe "comes from when the spigots are turned on and the oil flows through the pipeline." Despite the setback, American Indian activist Chase Iron Eyes said pipeline opponents will continue fighting the project in the courts and maintaining an on-the-ground presence in the drilling area, "in peaceful prayer and in dignity as we assert our rights to protect our environment, our economy and our sovereignty." ETP spokeswoman Vicki Granado said last week that the drilling work would take about two months and that the full pipeline system would be operational within three months. But David Debold, a lawyer for Dakota Access, said work is going more quickly and suggested the pipeline could be ready for oil in as soon as 30 days. "We're not in a position where we can agree to any kind of stopping of the pipeline," Debold said. In an email Monday evening to The Associated Press, Granado touted the efficiency of the company's equipment and crews, but didn't elaborate further. Energy Transfer Partners received final approval from the Army last week to lay pipe under the reservoir and complete the 1,200-mile pipeline. Drilling work began immediately under Lake Oahe, which is the water source for both tribes. The company's attorneys filed court documents early Monday urging Boasberg to reject the tribes' request, calling the new religious freedom argument "exceedingly tardy," ''not construction-related" and a "last-minute delay tactic." "Dakota Access has the greatest respect for the religious beliefs and traditions of (tribes). The emergency relief sought here simply is not necessary to protect the exercise of those beliefs or preserve those traditions," wrote William Scherman, a company attorney. The Corps also filed court documents Monday arguing that a work stoppage isn't warranted, saying the tribes will have plenty of time to make their case before oil flows through the pipeline. Work under Lake Oahe had been held up in the courts until President Donald Trump last month instructed the Army Corps of Engineers to advance construction. The Army is involved because its engineering branch manages the river and its system of hydroelectric dams, which is owned by the federal government. Energy Transfer Partners maintains that the pipeline is safe and disputes that cultural sites have been affected. But an encampment near the construction in southern North Dakota drew thousands of protesters last year in support of the tribes, leading to occasional clashes with law enforcement and more than 700 arrests. The camp has thinned to fewer than 300 people, but law enforcement officers continue to maintain a presence in the area. The cost to taxpayers has reached $33 million, the state's Joint Information Center reported Monday.

    Online Articles

    Online Articles

    Wed, 15 Feb 2017

  2. Velocity Midstream plans second oil pipeline, additional crude oil terminals in SCOOP

    Velocity Central Oklahoma Pipeline LLC has obtained long-term customer commitments supporting the construction of a second oil pipeline through the fairway of the SCOOP.

    Online Articles

    Online Articles

    Tue, 31 Jan 2017

  3. Velocity Midstream announces the construction of a second oil pipeline and additional crude oil terminals in the SCOOP

    Velocity Midstream Partners announced that Velocity Central Oklahoma Pipeline LLC, has obtained long-term customer commitments supporting the construction of a second oil pipeline through the fairway of the SCOOP.

    Online Articles

    Online Articles

    Thu, 2 Feb 2017

  4. EnQuest to buy stakes in Magnus field, other assets from BP

    EnQuest PLC is to buy a 25% stake in Magnus oil field in the UK North Sea from BP PLC, along with smaller interests in the Sullom Voe oil terminal, the Northern Leg Gas Pipeline, and the Ninian Pipeline System for $85 million.

    Online Articles

    Online Articles

    Tue, 24 Jan 2017

  1. BridgeTex Pipeline to expand capacity from Permian Basin to Houston Gulf Coast

    Online Articles

    Online Articles

    Tue, 24 Jan 2017

  2. BP starts production from Thunder Horse South expansion project

    BP PLC has started production from the Thunder Horse South expansion project in the deepwater Gulf of Mexico. It’s expected to boost production at the Thunder Horse facility by an estimated 50,000 boe/d gross.

    Online Articles

    Online Articles

    Mon, 23 Jan 2017

  3. First gas flows from Thien Ung offshore southern Vietnam

    Vietsovpetro has produced first gas and condensate from the TU-6 well of the BK-TNG platform at the Thien Ung field offshore Vietnam.

    Online Articles

    Online Articles

    Tue, 17 Jan 2017

  4. SoCalGas to use fiber optic technology to monitor gas pipelines in real time

    Southern California Gas Company will be one of the first natural gas utilities in the U.S. to incorporate innovative fiber optic cable technology to detect impacts and leaks along its transmission and high-pressure gas pipeline systems. 

    Online Articles

    Online Articles

    Thu, 12 Jan 2017

  5. Zinke says he would move land management authority out of Washington

    US Rep. Ryan Zinke said he would work to have more federal land management decisions reached outside of Washington, DC, as a product of closer collaboration with states and stakeholders if he is confirmed as the next US Secretary of the Interior.

    Online Articles

    Online Articles

    Wed, 18 Jan 2017

  6. Nord Stream systems deliver more gas to Europe

    The twin Nord Stream gas pipelines in the Baltic Sea operated at 80% of their combined annual capacity of 55 bcm last year, delivering 43.8 bcm of natural gas to consumers in the European Union.

    Online Articles

    Online Articles

    Wed, 18 Jan 2017

  7. BP starts up Thunder Horse expansion early, under budget

    BP has started up the Thunder Horse South Expansion project in the deepwater Gulf of Mexico 11 months ahead of schedule and $150 million under budget.

    Online Articles

    Online Articles

    Mon, 23 Jan 2017

  8. Deepwater: BP Thunder Horse South Expansion starts up ahead of schedule and under budget

    Deepwater Gulf of Mexico start-up expected to add 50,000 barrels of production, marking latest major investment in U.S. offshore region.

    Online Articles

    Online Articles

    Tue, 24 Jan 2017

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