Natural Gas Capacity

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  1. Massachusetts court bars billing electricity ratepayers for new gas pipelines

    The Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court has prohibited ratepayer-funded natural gas capacity purchases by electric utilities. The Aug. 17 decision vacated a Department of Public Utilities Commission order giving it authority to approve electric utilities’ contracts for new gas pipeline capacity if they are in the public interest. DPUC’s Department of Energy Resources sought the order because it believed gas pipeline constraints have caused unseasonably high winter electricity prices in the Bay State. But the court said allowing electric utilities to pass pipeline capacity costs through to ratepayers violates the state’s 1997 utilities restructuring act. Unlike gas utilities that regularly contract for capacity, Massachusetts electric utilities are generally unwilling or unable to enter into long-term firm gas contracts, it noted in its decision. “For these generators, there is added risk for such contracting because there is no means by which they can be reasonably assured of receiving enough revenue to cover the cost of securing the gas capacity over the course of each year,” it said. Gas pipeline owners and operators, on the other hand, are not willing to build new capacity without long-term contracts, it continued. “Thus, pipeline companies do not have sufficient assurances such that they are willing to build additional pipeline capacity for gas-fired electric generators, despite the increasing gas demand for heating and as a source of supply for electric power,” the court said, adding that DOER characterized this as a mismatch which needed to be addressed. It found the order invalid because it would undermine the restructuring act’s main objectives and reexpose ratepayers to financial risks from which the legislature sought to protect them. A Massachusetts Petroleum Council official immediately criticized the court’s decision. “Inexpensive, clean-burning natural gas is so close yet so far away for Bay Staters, who have paid some of the highest energy costs in the nation,” Associate Director Beth Treseder said. “This decision will not give consumers relief in energy prices, potentially causing them to needlessly spend millions more each year for electricity and gas as compared to neighboring states,” she said. Contact Nick Snow at nicks@pennwell.com .

    Online Articles

    Online Articles

    Thu, 18 Aug 2016

  2. Oil and Gas News: Maine regulators vote to expand natural gas capacity

    The Maine Public Utilities Commission has approved a plan to require utility ratepayers to help pay for expanded natural gas.

    Online Articles

    Online Articles

    Wed, 20 Jul 2016

  3. Gas Pipeline News: Court: Ratepayers can't be asked to finance gas pipelines

    Electric utilities cannot pass on to their Massachusetts ratepayers the costs of financing new natural gas pipelines, the state's highest court ruled on Wednesday.

    Online Articles

    Online Articles

    Thu, 18 Aug 2016

  4. Plan approved to increase wind & natural gas capacity , use less coal

    The Grand River Dam Authority Board of Directors approved an electric generation resource plan that would increase natural gas and wind energy capacity.

    Online Articles

    Online Articles

    Wed, 21 Aug 2013

  1. Natural Gas Capacity , Construction Gaining Ground in Latin America

    Magazine Articles

    Magazine Articles

    Sun, 1 Aug 1999

  2. FERC approves new natural gas capacity to help relieve bottlenecks in the Southwestern U.S.

    FERC has approved El Paso Natural Gas Co.'s Power-Up Project that will help relieve capacity bottlenecks in the southwestern U.S. and will provide improved energy infrastructure for the region.

    Online Articles

    Online Articles

    Wed, 4 Jun 2003

  3. Study Forecasts Huge Fall in US Coal Burn Under EPA's Clean Power Plan

    Depending on factors like how individual states respond with their own state implementation plans, coal burn at U.S. power plants could fall from a little less than 800 million tons in 2022, the first year for implementation of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Clean Power Plan, to as low ...

    Online Articles

    Online Articles

    Mon, 21 Dec 2015

  4. New England governors look to expand renewable energy, natural gas

    Massachusetts Gov. Charlie Baker said the effort is part of a push to reduce energy costs, strengthen grid reliability and increase the region's economic competitiveness.

    Online Articles

    Online Articles

    Thu, 26 Feb 2015

  5. Interstate gas pipeline company wins $32.9M judgment in contract dispute with steelmaker

    A Minnesota federal court has entered a $32.9 million judgment on behalf of Great Lakes Gas Transmission Limited Partnership, a Houston-based interstate natural gas pipeline company, finding that an Indian conglomerate violated the company’s contract to provide natural gas transmission services.

    Online Articles

    Online Articles

    Thu, 17 Sep 2015

  6. EIA: CO2 emissions to change only modestly by 2040

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions in the power sector declined by 363 million metric tons between 2005 and 2013, this according to a recent report by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA).

    Online Articles

    Online Articles

    Thu, 28 May 2015

  7. PJM to see 8,700 MW in power plant retirements in May, June

    The onslaught of coal capacity retirements in May and June could likely exert uward pressure on power prices in PJM

    Online Articles

    Online Articles

    Mon, 11 May 2015

  8. Genscape report says 8,700 MW to retire in PJM during May and June

    The already significant pace of coal plant retirements in PJM Interconnection is about to kick into high gear over the next couple of months, according to a new study by Genscape.

    Online Articles

    Online Articles

    Mon, 11 May 2015

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