Hydroelectric Dams

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  1. Oil and Gas: Judge denies request to halt Dakota Access pipeline work

      WASHINGTON (AP) — A federal judge on Monday refused to stop construction on the last stretch of the Dakota Access pipeline , which is progressing much faster than expected and could be operational in as little as 30 days. U.S. District Judge James Boasberg ruled after an hourlong hearing that as long as oil isn't flowing through the pipeline, there is no imminent harm to the Cheyenne River and Standing Rock Sioux tribes, which are suing to stop the project. But he said he'd consider the arguments more thoroughly at another hearing on Feb. 27. That gives the tribes hope that they still might prevail, Cheyenne River Chairman Harold Frazier said. "To put that pipeline in the ground would be irreparable harm for us in our culture," he said. The tribes requested the temporary injunction last week after Texas-based Energy Transfer Partners got federal permission to lay pipe under a Missouri River reservoir in North Dakota. That's the last big section of the $3.8 billion pipeline, which would carry oil from North Dakota to Illinois. The tribes say the pipeline would endanger their cultural sites and water supply. They added a religious freedom component to their case last week by arguing that clean water is necessary to practice the Sioux religion. "The mere presence of the oil in the pipeline renders the water spiritually impure," said Nicole Ducheneaux, lawyer for the Cheyenne River Sioux tribe. But Boasberg said any immediate harm to the tribe "comes from when the spigots are turned on and the oil flows through the pipeline." Despite the setback, American Indian activist Chase Iron Eyes said pipeline opponents will continue fighting the project in the courts and maintaining an on-the-ground presence in the drilling area, "in peaceful prayer and in dignity as we assert our rights to protect our environment, our economy and our sovereignty." ETP spokeswoman Vicki Granado said last week that the drilling work would take about two months and that the full pipeline system would be operational within three months. But David Debold, a lawyer for Dakota Access, said work is going more quickly and suggested the pipeline could be ready for oil in as soon as 30 days. "We're not in a position where we can agree to any kind of stopping of the pipeline," Debold said. In an email Monday evening to The Associated Press, Granado touted the efficiency of the company's equipment and crews, but didn't elaborate further. Energy Transfer Partners received final approval from the Army last week to lay pipe under the reservoir and complete the 1,200-mile pipeline. Drilling work began immediately under Lake Oahe, which is the water source for both tribes. The company's attorneys filed court documents early Monday urging Boasberg to reject the tribes' request, calling the new religious freedom argument "exceedingly tardy," ''not construction-related" and a "last-minute delay tactic." "Dakota Access has the greatest respect for the religious beliefs and traditions of (tribes). The emergency relief sought here simply is not necessary to protect the exercise of those beliefs or preserve those traditions," wrote William Scherman, a company attorney. The Corps also filed court documents Monday arguing that a work stoppage isn't warranted, saying the tribes will have plenty of time to make their case before oil flows through the pipeline. Work under Lake Oahe had been held up in the courts until President Donald Trump last month instructed the Army Corps of Engineers to advance construction. The Army is involved because its engineering branch manages the river and its system of hydroelectric dams, which is owned by the federal government. Energy Transfer Partners maintains that the pipeline is safe and disputes that cultural sites have been affected. But an encampment near the construction in southern North Dakota drew thousands of protesters last year in support of the tribes, leading to occasional clashes with law enforcement and more than 700 arrests. The camp has thinned to fewer than 300 people, but law enforcement officers continue to maintain a presence in the area. The cost to taxpayers has reached $33 million, the state's Joint Information Center reported Monday.

    Online Articles

    Online Articles

    Wed, 15 Feb 2017

  2. Hydroelectric Power: Alcoa completes sale of 4 NC dams to Cube Hydro

    A Maryland company is completing its purchase of four North Carolina hydroelectric dams from Alcoa Inc., which ends nearly a century of ownership.

    Online Articles

    Online Articles

    Sat, 4 Feb 2017

  3. Oil and Gas: Dakota Access opponents urge action as Army consent looms

    Opponents of the Dakota Access oil pipeline called for protests around the world Wednesday as the Army prepared to greenlight the final stage of the $3.8 billion project's construction.

    Online Articles

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    Thu, 9 Feb 2017

  4. Hydroelectric Power: Vermont study says no to purchase of hydroelectric dams

    A study says the state of Vermont should not try to buy a series of 13 hydroelectric dams on the Connecticut and Deerfield rivers.

    Online Articles

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    Thu, 27 Oct 2016

  1. Vermont Told Not to Purchase Hydroelectric Dams

    Online Articles

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    Mon, 31 Oct 2016

  2. Renewable Energy: Chinese renewable power giant builds global empire

    Other investors are wary of Brazil, but when Duke Energy wanted to sell 10 hydroelectric dams there, a Chinese utility shrugged off the country's economic turmoil and paid $1.2 billion to add them to an energy empire that stretches from Malaysia to Germany to the Amazon.

    Online Articles

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    Thu, 5 Jan 2017

  3. HCDC transmission line, hydropower on Trump admin wish list

    It was not known what financial impact the Trump administration could offer since the Plains & Eastern Clean Line is considered a private investment

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    Thu, 26 Jan 2017

  4. Several nonpowered dams along the Ohio River to be converted to hydroelectric dams in 2016

    The National Hydropower Association estimates that 3% of the nation's 80,000 dams currently generate electricity.

    Online Articles

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    Fri, 15 Jul 2016

  5. PPL will sell three hydroelectric dams in Maine

    PPL Corp. reached an agreement with a coalition of government agencies and private groups to sell three of its nine hydroelectric dams in Maine.

    Online Articles

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    Tue, 7 Oct 2003

  6. Vermont study says buying Canadian hydro dams would be too expensive

    TransCanada bought the 13 hydroelectric dams from USGen New England in 2005  

    Online Articles

    Online Articles

    Mon, 31 Oct 2016

  7. Hydroelectric Power News: Alcoa sells NC river dams to Maryland clean-power company

    Alcoa Inc. is ending a century of ownership and its years-long relicensing fight over four North Carolina hydroelectric dams by selling them to a Maryland company that specializes in running clean-power projects.

    Online Articles

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    Wed, 13 Jul 2016

  8. Hydropower Regulatory Efficiency Act co-sponsor likely nominee for Secretary of Interior

    U.S. Rep. Cathy McMorris Rodgers, a sixth-term Republican from the state of Washington, will likely be nominated by President-elect Donald Trump for Secretary of Interior, according to published reports. Rodgers is the highest-ranking Republican woman in the U.S. House of Representatives and was ...

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    Tue, 13 Dec 2016

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