Congress

Home>Topics>Congress
Refine Results
  1. All
  2. Articles
  3. Online Articles
  4. Magazine Articles
  5. Videos
  1. Oil and Gas News: AP Exclusive: Iraq oil fires could jeopardize Mosul mission

    This satellite image provided by PlanetLabs via AllSource Analysis shows oil fields burning in the Qayara oil field on Aug. 26, 2016, south of Mosul, Iraq, on the west bank of the Tigris River. The fire at one of Iraq’s major oil fields could hinder military and humanitarian efforts as operations to recapture the Islamic State-held stronghold of Mosul get underway. Black smoke continues to billow into the air from the oil field, damaged by IS militants last month as they fled the town, creating health risks to civilians and troops in the area. The fires are also fogging up the skies in the area, where critically important airstrikes and aerial reconnaissance missions are taking place almost daily. (PlanetLabs via AllSource Analysis via AP) WASHINGTON (AP) — A fire at one of Iraq's major oil fields could hinder military and humanitarian efforts as operations to recapture the Islamic State stronghold of Mosul get underway. Black smoke continues to billow into the air from the Qayara oil field, damaged by IS militants last month as they fled the town, creating health risks for civilians and troops amassing there. The fires are also clogging up the skies in the area, where critically important airstrikes and aerial reconnaissance missions are taking place almost daily. Located on the west bank of the Tigris River, about 40 miles (65 kilometers) south of Mosul, Qayara has since become an important staging ground for military and humanitarian efforts ahead of the Mosul operation since it was recaptured by Iraqi forces last month. "Stabilizing Qayara can't wait — it has to happen now," Lise Grande, the U.N.'s humanitarian coordinator for Iraq, told The Associated Press. "Everything for the Mosul operation hinges on Qayara," she said. "It's the staging ground for military forces and it's where 350,000 of the 1 million people who are expected to flee (Mosul) will either find shelter or pass through." There are slow-going Iraqi efforts to contain the fires, but nearly a month after the town was recaptured from the militants, smoke and toxic fumes continue to pollute the air in and around Qayara. The Iraqi Oil Ministry spokesman, Assem Jihad, said Wednesday that IS militants set fire to 11 oil wells in Qayara to derail security forces and wreak havoc in the area as they fled. He said fires at nine of the wells have been extinguished, but two continue to burn powerfully. The images of smoke and flames from the oil wells are reminiscent of the oil fires in Kuwait after the Iraqi military reportedly set fire to hundreds of wells when Saddam Hussein invaded the neighboring Persian Gulf nation in the early 1990s. "In putting out the fires in Kuwait the firefighters used water pipes and pumped the water from the Persian Gulf to spray at the base of the fires," said Kourosh Kian, an expert in petroleum drilling and reservoir engineering. Kian, a system engineer at GE Aviation, said the simplest method to extinguish these types of fires is to inject water under high pressure at the base of the fire. Since Qayara is on the Tigris River, there would be no problem with the water supply, he said. The two main fields in the area, Qayara and Najmah, had been producing about 30,000 barrels per day of crude before the Islamic State took control of Iraq's Nineveh Province in June 2014. While Iraqi forces now remain in control of the area, it is far from stable. At the Qayara West air base, where hundreds of U.S. troops are working to advise and assist their Iraqi counterparts, a small rocket that contained a mustard agent landed, Gen. Joseph Dunford, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, told Congress on Thursday. A U.S. official, who discussed details of the incident on Wednesday on condition of anonymity, said a small group of U.S. soldiers who inspected remnants of the rocket after it exploded found a black, oily substance on a fragment of metal. An initial test of the suspicious substance showed it contained residue of mustard agent, but a second test was negative. Militants continue to dwell around the town to the west and along the eastern bank toward the town of al-Alam. The Iraqi military, backed by coalition airstrikes and coalition advise-and-assist operations, looks to recapture more territory from the military group, which at one point in 2014 controlled about a third of Iraq and neighboring Syria. U.S.-led coalition forces have launched more than 460 airstrikes around Qayara since August 2014 and more than 1,800 around the city of Mosul itself. But for aid workers in the country, the fires are an immediate primary concern as they prepare for a potential mass influx of displaced people as Mosul operations get underway. "There is also a major effort to stabilize Qayara," Grande said. "Hundreds of thousands of people who may flee Mosul are likely to come in this direction."

    Online Articles

    Online Articles

    Fri, 23 Sep 2016

  2. Coal News: Senate panel backs bill to protect miners' retirement funds

    An election-year bill to protect health care and pension benefits for about 120,000 retired coal miners and their families is one step closer to a vote in the full Senate.

    Online Articles

    Online Articles

    Thu, 22 Sep 2016

  3. FERC rejects appeal over its authority on small hydro projects on Reclamation properties

    The members of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission on Sept. 22 decided that the commission has no authority to permit grandfathered small "conduit" hydroelectric projects on the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation's sprawling water management system under a 2013 law that promotes the development of ...

    Online Articles

    Online Articles

    Thu, 22 Sep 2016

  4. Congress Seeking Broader Look at Solar Firms, Tax Credits

    Republican leaders of key financial panels in the House and Senate are seeking an expanded review of renewable energy tax credits being received by companies in both the utility-scale and rooftop solar business.  

    Online Articles

    Online Articles

    Mon, 19 Sep 2016

  1. Moniz says DOE is working hard for coal power

    Online Articles

    Online Articles

    Wed, 14 Sep 2016

  2. Ocean Wave Energy: Developers face challenges capturing wave energy

    Although wave-generated power could meet a quarter of America's energy needs, the technology lags other renewables such as wind and solar. But the U.S. Navy has established a test site in Hawaii, where power from floating devices travels a mile through undersea cables to Oahu's power grid — the ...

    Online Articles

    Online Articles

    Tue, 20 Sep 2016

  3. RINs program within RFS created opportunities for fraud, report says

    A program that the US Environmental Protection Agency designed to help refiners and other obligated parties meet renewable fuel volume obligations under the federal Renewable Fuel Standard actually “provided the unintended framework for a new and persistent area of fraud,” a report released Sept. ...

    Online Articles

    Online Articles

    Tue, 20 Sep 2016

  4. Congress seeking broader look at solar power firms, tax credits

    Use of tax credits, yieldcos being explored

    Online Articles

    Online Articles

    Mon, 19 Sep 2016

  5. Underwater monument a trophy in Obama’s quest for legacy

    Oil and gas drilling was hardly imminent off New England when US President Barack Obama created an underwater museum for the study of marine life.

    Online Articles

    Online Articles

    Fri, 16 Sep 2016

  6. Senate-House energy policy bill conference gets under way

    The joint congressional conference on federal energy policy reform legislation formally began on Sept. 8 as Republicans and Democrats from both sides of the Capitol acknowledged that changes are needed and much hard work lies ahead.

    Online Articles

    Online Articles

    Thu, 8 Sep 2016

  7. Coal News: Energy secretary: Administration working hard for coal power

    President Barack Obama's energy secretary said Monday that the administration isn't waging a "war on coal" and is working to maintain coal as an important part of a low-carbon energy future.

    Online Articles

    Online Articles

    Tue, 13 Sep 2016

  8. Energy News: OBAMA LEGACY: Quiet but big changes in energy, pollution

    Mostly unnoticed amid the political brawl over climate change, the U.S. has undergone a quiet transformation in how and where it gets its energy during Barack Obama's presidency, slicing the nation's output of polluting gases that are warming Earth.

    Online Articles

    Online Articles

    Tue, 6 Sep 2016

Get More Results