New Mexico tribes write Trump on Dakota pipeline dispute

By The Associated Press

Leaders of New Mexico's 23 Native American nations and pueblos expressing solidarity with opponents of the Dakota Access oil pipeline project in a letter to President Donald Trump.

Jemez Pueblo Gov. Jospeh A. Toya signs a letter to President Donald Trump expressing solidarity with opponents of the Dakota Access oil pipeline project at a gathering of Native American leaders in the New Mexico Statehouse in Santa Fe on Friday, Feb. 3, 2017. The annual Native American day in the state capital focused on water issues and honored Darlene Arviso of the Navajo Nation who delivers water free of charge to rural residents without access to running water. (AP Photo/Morgan Lee)

SANTA FE, N.M. (AP) — Leaders of New Mexico's 23 Native American nations and pueblos expressing solidarity with opponents of the Dakota Access oil pipeline project in a letter to President Donald Trump.

Tribal governors signed the letter Friday in the central rotunda of the state Capitol in a ceremony attended by Standing Rock Sioux tribal council member Robert Taken Alive.

Members of the Standing Rock Sioux tribe fear that an oil leak could contaminate its drinking water if plans move forward to lay a pipeline under a Missouri River reservoir in North Dakota. Trump has arranged a review of an earlier federal decision to block the project.

Acoma Pueblo Gov. Kurt Riley says Trump is new to governing and still needs to assess the federal government's relationship with Native Americans.

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