Renewable Energy News: Suniva powers Greenfield at Fort Campbell

Source: Suniva, Inc.

The 1.9MW solar array helped turn ten acres of retired landfill into a clean energy generating solar farm. Solar arrays atop capped landfills are an innovative way to provide power while leveraging brownfield sites.

Suniva, Inc., a member company of Shunfeng International Clean Energy Limited and the leading American manufacturer of high-efficiency solar cells and modules, with headquarters in metro-Atlanta and manufacturing facilities in Georgia and Michigan, today announces its Buy American-compliant Optimus solar panels are producing energy at a capped landfill at the Fort Campbell military base in Kentucky. 

The 1.9MW solar array, Powered by Suniva®, helped turn ten acres of retired landfill into a clean energy generating solar farm. Solar arrays atop capped landfills are an innovative way to provide power while leveraging brownfield sites. 

"Solar arrays such as this one at Fort Campbell serve as a two-fold solution: enhancing the foundation of the energy security for our nation's military bases, while at the same time, providing a sustainable benefit on previously unusable waste land," said Matt Card, executive vice president of commercial operations. "Beyond this application for our military, Suniva's products are an ideal fit for landfill reclamations such as this.  Because of the strict environmental regulations of building on a landfill, the infrastructure costs are typically higher than average.  The high power density of our modules helps reduce the overall racking footprint of these systems."

The project is a result of collaboration between Fort Campbell, the U.S. Department of Energy, the Kentucky Energy and Environment Cabinet, and Pennyrile Rural Electric Cooperative Corporation.   Pennyrile Rural Electric and Fort Campbell worked with the Kentucky Energy and Environment Cabinet in securing a grant for $3,100,000 for this renewable project, and Pennyrile financed $1,900,000 as a part of a Utility Energy Services Contract with Fort Campbell to pay for this project. Suniva worked with power management company Eaton, which provided engineering, procurement, construction (EPC) services as well as a range of electrical balance of system solutions for the first phase of the solar array at Fort Campbell.

"The solar project at Fort Campbell will help address the presidential mandate for federal agencies to meet 20 percent of their electricity needs through renewable energy sources by 2020," said John Stampfel, vice president and general manager, Electrical Engineering Services and Systems Division, Eaton. "With our expert engineering resources, balance of systems solutions and project collaborators, including Suniva, Eaton is well positioned to help the U.S. Army achieve its net zero energy goal through the development of secure, domestic and renewable energy resources."

"Suniva's Optimus power-dense solar panels can be found on many landfill reclamation projects, including its first array installed in North Carolina for Progress Energy.

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