The Fukushima nuclear disaster, 5 years on

By Mari Yamaguchi, Associated Press

Five years after a powerful earthquake and tsunami sent the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant in Japan into multiple meltdowns, cleaning up the mess both onsite and in surrounding towns remains a work in progress.

A doll sits on the balcony of a house in the abandoned town of Namie, outside the the nuclear exclusion zone surrounding the crippled Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear plant in Japan. Five years after a powerful earthquake and tsunami sent the nuclear power plant in the country into multiple meltdowns, cleaning up the mess both onsite and in surrounding towns remains a work in progress. (AP Photo/Greg Baker, File)

 

TOKYO (AP) — Five years after a powerful earthquake and tsunami sent the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant in Japan into multiple meltdowns, cleaning up the mess both onsite and in surrounding towns remains a work in progress. Here's a look, by the numbers, at the widespread effects of radiation from the March 11, 2011, disaster:

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164,865: Fukushima residents who fled their homes after the disaster.

97,320: Number who still haven't returned.

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49: Municipalities in Fukushima that have completed decontamination work.

45: Number that have not.

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30: Percent of electricity generated by nuclear power before the disaster.

1.7: Percent of electricity generated by nuclear power after the disaster.

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3: Reactors online, out of 43 now workable. On Wednesday, however, a court issued an order for one of those three reactors to be shut down immediately.

54: Reactors with safety permits before the disaster.

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53: Percent of the 1,017 Japanese in a March 5-6 Mainichi Shimbun newspaper survey who opposed restarting nuclear power plants.

30: Percent who supported restarts. The remaining 17 percent were undecided.

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760,000: Metric tons of contaminated water currently stored at the Fukushima nuclear plant.

1,000: Tanks at the plant storing radioactive water after treatment.

10.7 million: Number of 1-ton container bags containing radioactive debris and other waste collected in decontamination outside the plant.

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7,000: Workers decommissioning the Fukushima plant.

26,000: Laborers on decontamination work offsite.

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200: Becquerels of radioactive cesium per cubic meter (264 gallons) in seawater immediately off the plant in 2015.

50 million: Becquerels of cesium per cubic meter in the same water in 2011.

7,400: Maximum number of becquerels of cesium per cubic meter allowed in drinking water by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

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Sources: Fukushima prefectural government, Japan Ministry of Internal Affairs, the Tokyo Electric Power Co., the Nuclear Regulation Authority, the Federation of Electric Power Companies and the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution.

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