SolarCity and Direct Energy help Johns Hopkins Medicine go solar

Source: SolarCity

New 13 megawatt solar power system will feature more than 40,000 solar panels in Queen Anne’s County, supply nearly 20 percent of Johns Hopkins power.

The 13.6 megawatt solar installation will feature more than 40,000 solar panels across a 97-acre plot of land in Wye Mills, part of Queen Anne’s County, Maryland.

 

Johns Hopkins has announced a new solar project that will produce affordable and reliable solar energy to power to its facilities. The solar project, Johns Hopkins’ first, is located in Queen Anne’s County, Maryland and is expected to offset about 18 percent of the total energy Johns Hopkins facilities utilize. Installed and maintained by SolarCity with financing and management by Direct Energy Business, the solar power system will deliver the energy generated to Johns Hopkins for less than their current electricity rate, and provide a long term hedge against the rising costs of purchasing power.

Due to lack of roof or ground space on current facilities for such a large-scale solar project, Johns Hopkins chose a remote solar arrangement that could still provide its facilities with affordable power. The remote solar system is made possible through cooperation of PJM Interconnection, the regional transmission organization that coordinates the movement of wholesale electricity. Direct Energy Business already works directly with PJM on behalf of Johns Hopkins to schedule and procure wholesale energy, and will now secure an equivalent amount of energy as is generated by the new solar system at a low, predictable rate. The 13.6 megawatt solar installation will feature more than 40,000 solar panels across a 97-acre plot of land in Wye Mills, part of Queen Anne’s County, Maryland. 

The solar system is expected to avoid the emission of 1.4 million metric tons of CO2 into the atmosphere over the next 20 years, which is equivalent to removing more than 313,000 cars from U.S. roads for one year. In two decades, the system will also produce the energy equivalent to powering more than 180,000 homes for a year.*

OneEnergy Renewables located the site and led the pre-construction development work.  

The project is expected to be completed and operational within the first half of 2016 and will serve the Johns Hopkins East Baltimore Campus.

*Environmental calculations are based on 25 year solar system contracts and data from the United States Environmental Protection Agency.

Did You Like this Article? Get All the Energy Industry News Delivered to Your Inbox

Subscribe to an email newsletter today at no cost and receive the latest news and information.

 Subscribe Now

Whitepapers

The Time is Right for Optimum Reliability: Capital-Intensive Industries and Asset Performance Management

Imagine a plant that is no longer at risk of a random shutdown. Imagine not worrying about losing...

Going Digital: The New Normal in Oil & Gas

In this whitepaper you will learn how Keystone Engineering, ONGC, and Saipem are using software t...

Maximizing Operational Excellence

In a recent survey conducted by PennEnergy Research, 70% of surveyed energy industry professional...

Leveraging the Power of Information in the Energy Industry

Information Governance is about more than compliance. It’s about using your information to drive ...

Latest PennEnergy Jobs

PennEnergy Oil & Gas Jobs