The German nuclear exit: From Brokdorf to Fukushima (Part 2)

The Bulletin of Atomic Scientists

The Bulletin of Atomic Scientists (BAS) has released its latest issue, The German nuclear exit, featuring five comprehensive editorials on the complexities of the German nuclear phase-out. The second offering in this six-part installment to be presented on PennEnergy.com comes from Alexander Glaser, a Princeton researcher and member of the Bulletin’s Science and Security Board.

Part 1: The German nuclear exit: An introduction

Part 3: The Politics of Phase-Out

Part 4: Exit economics: The relatively low cost of Germany’s nuclear phase-out

From Brokdorf to Fukushima: The long journey to nuclear phase-out
By Alexander Glaser

Shortly after the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station, Germany’s government started preparing legislation that would close the country’s last nuclear power plant by 2022. But this wasn’t an entirely new development: Germany had been planning to leave nuclear energy behind for decades, and to understand its nuclear phase-out requires a close look at the past. Several projects and events mark the beginnings of the German anti-nuclear power movement: Among them are the huge protests over the Brokdorf reactor, which began in 1976 and led to civil war-like confrontations with police, and the controversy over the Kalkar fast-neutron reactor in the mid-1970s. Because of these and subsequent developments—including the 1986 Chernobyl accident—by the 1990s, no one in German political life seriously entertained the idea of new reactor construction. This tacit policy consensus led to energy forecasts and scenarios that focused on energy efficiency, demand reduction, and renewable energy sources. By the time of the Fukushima accidents, many of these new energy priorities had already begun to be implemented and to show effect. Replacing nuclear power in Germany with other energy sources on an accelerated schedule is likely to come with a price tag, but, at the same time, Germany’s nuclear phase-out could provide a proof-of-concept, demonstrating the political and technical feasibility of abandoning a controversial high-risk technology. Germany’s nuclear phase-out, successful or not, may well become a game changer for nuclear energy worldwide.

Access the complete article here: 
From Brokdorf to Fukushima: The long journey to nuclear phase-out

 

Part 1: The German nuclear exit: An introduction

Part 3: The Politics of Phase-Out

Part 4: Exit economics: The relatively low cost of Germany’s nuclear phase-out



Did You Like this Article? Get All the Energy Industry News Delivered to Your Inbox

Subscribe to an email newsletter today at no cost and receive the latest news and information.

 Subscribe Now

Whitepapers

Reach New Heights: Six Best Practices in Planning and Scheduling

These 6 best practices have created millions of dollars in value for many global companies. Learn...

Making DDoS Mitigation Part of Your Incident Response Plan: Critical Steps and Best Practices

Like a new virulent strain of flu, the impact of a distributed denial of service (DDoS) attack is...

The Multi-Tax Challenge of Managing Excise Tax and Sales Tax

To be able to accurately calculate multiple tax types, companies must be prepared to continually ...

Operational Analytics in the Power Industry

Cloud computing, smart grids, and other technologies are changing transmission and distribution. ...

Latest Energy Jobs

View more Job Listings >>

Archived Articles

PennEnergy Articles
2008 | 2009 | 2010 | 2011 | 2012 | 2013

OGJ Articles
2011 | 2012 | 2013

OGFJ Articles
2011 | 2012 | 2013

Power Engineering Articles
2011 | 2012 | 2013

Power Engineering Intl Articles
2011 | 2012 | 2013

Utility Products Articles
2011 | 2012 | 2013

HydroWorld Articles
2011 | 2012 | 2013

COSPP Articles
2011 | 2012 | 2013

ELP Articles
2011 | 2012 | 2013