Pentair wins valves deal for China nuclear power plant

Pentair Valves & Controls has won a deal to supply more than 200 high pressure, electric operated gate and check valves to the largest nuclear power plant in mainland China.

The Sempell safet Pentair Sempell wedge gate valve y relief and isolation valves will be installed next year in the main steam and emergency core cooling systems in two new pressurised water reactors for units 3 and 4 at Tianwan power plant, in Jiangsu province. The valves are engineered and manufactured at Pentair’s facility in Germany.

Pentair said that it won the contract because its equipment is engineered to eliminate the potential for thermal binding, which can have a substantial impact on the safety and availability of critical valves due to the additional force needed to open cold wedge gate valves.

“In extreme cases, thermal binding prevents valves from opening, leading to substantial safety risks,” the company explained.

Paul Schaller, Pentair’s sales director of nuclear valves, said:  “We are actively working with EPCs in the Russian and Chinese markets to provide advanced valve design and improvements which help to increase the safety level of future nuclear power plants.”

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