Renewables to be boosted by new IBM innovation

IBM (NYSE: IBM) has announced a technology, which it calls the Hybrid Renewable Energy Forecasting (HyRef), which it believes will help increase the proportion of renewable power in the grid.

The technological advance sees big data analytics being utilised to predict the availability of renewable energy.

The advanced power and weather modelling technology within the solution is aimed at helping utilities increase the reliability of renewable energy resources.

IBM

When combined with analytics technology, the data-assimilation based solution can produce accurate local weather forecasts within a wind farm as far as one month in advance, or in 15-minute increments, according to the company.

Using local weather forecasts, HyRef can predict the performance of each individual wind turbine and estimate the amount of generated renewable energy.

Vice Admiral Dennis McGinn, president and CEO of the American Council On Renewable Energy (ACORE) said, "The weather modelling and forecasting data generated from HyRef will significantly improve this process and in turn, put us one step closer to maximizing the full potential of renewable resources."


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