US coal power station mandated to install pollution controls

A federal appeals court has ruled that the owners of the San Juan Generating Station, a huge coal fired power plant in New Mexico, US must continue with plans to install strong pollution controls.

Several Californian cities purchase electricity from the plant.

San Juan coal power station The federal Environmental Protection Agency ruled last fall that the plant was required to install strong "selective catalytic reduction," or SCR, equipment to cut its yearly output of 16000 tons of ozone, fine particulate matter and other pollutants in order to meet federal standards.

The plant’s owner, energy company PNM, is appealing the EPA ruling, and the company and New Mexico Gov. Susana Martinez had motioned to delay the implementation of those controls until the appeal is decided.

The U.S. 10th Circuit Court of Appeals denied the motion Thursday in a ruling only a couple of sentences long.

Last week's ruling came on the heels of a Sierra Club report that found that at the same time PNM was fighting the more costly pollution controls, it had dramatically increased its rates and its profits, while not meeting state energy-efficiency and renewables targets.

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