Indian Point 3 returns to service following transformer fire

Indian Point Unit 3 in New York returned to service more than two weeks after a transformer failure and fire shut down the unit.

A transformer on the non-nuclear side of the plant failed and caught fire on May 9, prompting the unit to shut down. The fire ruptured a tank, which leaked a clear, light mineral oil known as dielectric fluid on the Hudson River.

Preliminary estimates from the U.S. Coast Guard, based on data from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, indicates that about 3,000 gallons of dielectric fluid entered the river. The transformer held about 24,000 gallons of fluid, which acts as an electrical insulator and coolant inside the transformers. Entergy (NYSE: ETR) personnel have conducted assessments of approximately 25 locations regarding potential oil sheens in the river, and implemented appropriate mitigation efforts at five of the sites. The State Department of Environmental Conservation determined no other action was needed at the other 20 locations.

The public can report any oil sheen sightings to Entergy at 1-800-472-6372 or environment@safesecurevital.com.

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