Environmental group urges new plan for coal-fired power plant

Environmental group Western Resource Advocates is requesting the Utah Public Service Commission reconsider its approval of emissions upgrades planned for the 2,120 MW Jim Bridger Power Plant in Wyoming, according to a report from The Salt Lake Tribune.

The commission preapproved the installation of selective catalytic reduction retrofits for two of the four coal-fired units at the plant in May, according to the report. The issue is before the commission because much of the electricity from the plant is used in Utah.

According to Steven Michel, a New Mexico-based attorney for Western Resource Advocates, the plant’s owner, Rocky Mountain Power, could save ratepayers more and cut overall pollution more by converting half of the production to natural gas units and using less expensive non-catalytic reduction clean-air technology on the other half, the Tribune reported.

The administrator for the commission told the Tribune the request to reconsider or rehear the approval of the selective catalytic reduction retrofits is before the commission, and a decision on the matter is expected soon.

Rocky Mountain Power is a subsidiary of PacifiCorp.

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