Consumers Energy confirms plans to mothball 320 MW coal fired power plant

By Jeff Postelwait, Associate/Online Editor, Electric Light & Power/POWERGRID International

Consumers Energy's president confirmed his company's decision to shut down the 320 MW coal-fired B.C. Cobb Generating Plant in reports by local newspapers.

John Russell, Consumers Energy president and CEO, said the 65-year-old power plant would be mothballed on or around 2015. Russell said changing environmental regulations were a factor in the choice to halt operations at the five-unit generation facility.

The utility first committed to closing the power plant in December 2011. Regulations on the emission of mercury, fine particulates and nitrogen dioxide from coal power plants begin in 2015.

The plant has five units — three natural gas-fired and two coal-fired. Only the coal units are currently in operation.

The plant is located on about 300 acres near Lake Michigan on the shores of Muskegon Lake. It employs more than 115 plant workers and other staff.

CMS Energy (NYSE: CMS), based in Michigan, is the parent company of Consumers Energy.

This article was originally published in Electric Light & Power/POWERGRID International. It was republished with permission.

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