Duke unveils new logo, changes names of Progress Energy units

Duke Energy new logo

Duke Energy (NYSE: DUK) unveiled a new corporate logo following its merger with Progress Energy in July.

The logo was developed internally and will be used by the company on signs, vehicles and other locations starting in March 2013 in Indiana, Ohio and Kentucky, as well as areas of North and South Carolina served by Duke Energy prior to the merger. The colors of the new logo reflect Duke Energy's commitment to sustainability, technology and energy efficiency. It draws on elements from the separate companies’ logos, such as Progress Energy’s “star” and the “swoosh” in the D in Duke.

In April 2013, the company will roll out the logo in Florida, as well as those areas of North and South Carolina served by Progress Energy before the merger.

Also in April, two former Progress Energy units will change names. Progress Energy Florida will adopt the Duke Energy name. Progress Energy Carolinas will become Duke Energy Progress. Duke Energy Progress will use a modified version of the new logo that includes the word “Progress” to differentiate it from Duke Energy Carolinas, which serves customers in different areas of the Carolinas.

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