Petronas, Airborne to test thermoplastic composite pipe for flowline application

Offshore staff

IJMUIDEN, the Netherlands – Petronas has contracted Airborne Oil & Gas to supply thermoplastic composite pipe (TCP) for a subsea flowline connection of two platforms offshore Malaysia.

Airborne will supply 550 m (1,804 ft) of 6-in. (15.25-cm) TCP flowline and related equipment plus offshore installation, engineering, and field support for the pilot project. Water depth is 30 m (98 ft).

“At Petronas we recognize the potential for the use of non-metallic pipe as a substitute for carbon steel under certain conditions and will embark on the world’s first offshore pilot having done extensive qualification of the material, install-ability, and operability of the pipe,” said Datin Rashidah Karim, head of Operational Technology, Petronas Carigali.

“Furthermore, by close collaboration between the installation contractor, Airborne Oil & Gas and Petronas, adopting an integral design approach, a cost-effective installation method has been developed that allows for a total project cost reduction while meeting Petronas’ requirements such as for instance on-bottom stability.”

08/18/2015

 

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