PGN contracts DCN to repair pipeline in Java Sea

Offshore staff

BERGEN OP ZOOM, Holland – Indonesian state-owned Perushaan Gas Negara has awarded DCN International Diving and Marine Contractors and its Indonesian partner SGI a contract to seal a tear in a four-year-old pipeline in the Java Sea.

The tear on a weld seam was discovered in 2013. PGN had a temporary repair carried out. Last year, following extensive research, PGN decided to carry out a permanent repair to the 32-in. (81-cm) pipeline, at a depth of 27 m (89 ft). The repair will be carried out by DCN in 4Q 2015, while the pipeline remains fully pressurized.

“Fifteen divers will be specially trained for the PGN project here at DCN in Bergen op Zoom, of whom 10 prequalified divers will eventually be deployed,” said co-director Vim Vriens. “Of this team, nine divers will be spending approximately one month in saturation, in order to carry out the repair according to the welding method we propose. In total, a team of approximately 100 DCN staff will be deployed on location in the Java Sea, not including the crew of the Normand Baltic, the DP-2 diving vessel we have chartered for the project, equipped with a 100-metric ton crane, moonpool, and helicopter deck.”

07/21/2015

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