EPA to issue final water effluent rule for steam electric power plants

Sunbury_Power_Plant

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency will publish in the Nov. 3 Federal Register its final rule, promulgated under the Clean Water Act, strengthening the technology-based effluent limitations guidelines and standards for the steam electric power generating industry.

Steam electric power plants contribute the greatest amount of all toxic pollutants discharged to surface waters by industrial categories regulated under the CWA, the agency said. The pollutants discharged by this industry can cause severe health and environmental problems in the form of cancer and non-cancer risks in humans, lowered IQ among children and deformities and reproductive harm in fish and wildlife.

The final rule will become effective 60 days after publication in the Federal Register. This regulation shall be considered issued for purposes of judicial review 14 days after publication in the Federal Register. Only filing a petition for review in the U.S. Court of Appeals within 120 days after the regulation is considered issued for purposes of judicial review can have judicial review of this regulation.

The steam electric ELGs that EPA promulgated and revised in 1974, 1977, and 1982 are out of date, said EPA. They do not adequately control the pollutants (toxic metals and other) discharged by this industry, nor do they reflect relevant process and technology advances that have occurred in the last 30-plus years.

The rise of new processes for generating electric power (e.g. coal gasification) and the widespread implementation of air pollution controls (encouraging the installation of scrubbers and flue gas mercury control) have altered existing waste streams and created new types of wastewater at many steam electric power plants, particularly coal-fired plants.

"The processes employed and pollutants discharged by the industry look very different today than they did in 1982," said the final rule. "Many plants, nonetheless, still treat their wastewater using only surface impoundments, which are largely ineffective at controlling discharges of toxic pollutants and nutrients. This final rule addresses an outstanding public health and environmental problem by revising the steam electric ELGs, as they apply to a subset of power plants that discharge wastestreams containing toxic and other pollutants."

For existing sources that discharge directly to surface water, with the exception of oil-fired generating units and small generating units (those with a nameplate capacity of 50 MW or less), the final rule establishes effluent limitations based on Best Available Technology Economically Achievable. BAT is based on technological availability, economic achievability, and other statutory factors and is intended to reflect the highest performance in the industry.

The final rule establishes BAT limitations as follows:

·      For fly ash transport water, bottom ash transport water, and FGMC wastewater, there are two sets of BAT limitations. The first set of BAT limitations is a numeric effluent limitation on total suspended solids in the discharge of these wastewaters (these limitations are equal to the TSS limitations in the previously established best practicable control technology currently available regulations). The second set of BAT limitations is a zero discharge limitation for all pollutants in these wastewaters.

·      For FGD wastewater, there are two sets of BAT limitations. The first set of limitations is a numeric effluent limitation on TSS in the discharge of flue gas desulfurization wastewater (these limitations are equal to the TSS limitations in the previously established BPT regulations). The second set of BAT limitations is numeric effluent limitations on mercury, arsenic, selenium, and nitrate/nitrite as N in the discharge of FGD wastewater.

·      For gasification wastewater, there are two sets of BAT limitations. The first set of limitations is a numeric effluent limitation on TSS in the discharge of gasification wastewater (this limitation is equal to the TSS limitation in the previously established BPT regulations). The second set of BAT limitations is numeric effluent limitations on mercury, arsenic, selenium, and total dissolved solids in the discharge of gasification wastewater.

·      A numeric effluent limitation on TSS in the discharge of combustion residual leachate from landfills and surface impoundments. This limitation is equal to the TSS limitation in the previously established BPT regulations.

·      For oil-fired generating units and small generating units (50 MW or smaller), the final rule establishes BAT limitations on TSS in the discharge of fly ash transport water, bottom ash transport water, FGMC wastewater, FGD wastewater, and gasification wastewater. These limitations are equal to the TSS limitations in the existing BPT regulations.

The CWA mandates that new source performance standards reflect the greatest degree of effluent reduction that is achievable, including, where practicable, a standard permitting no discharge of pollutants. NSPS represent the most stringent controls attainable, taking into consideration the cost of achieving the effluent reduction and any non-water quality environmental impacts and energy requirements. For direct discharges to surface waters from new sources, including discharges from oil-fired generating units and small generating units, the final rule establishes NSPS as follows:

·      A zero discharge standard for all pollutants in fly ash transport water, bottom ash transport water, and FGMC wastewater.

·      Numeric standards on mercury, arsenic, selenium, and TDS in the discharge of FGD wastewater.

·      Numeric standards on mercury and arsenic in the discharge of combustion residual leachate.

Pretreatment Standards for Existing Sources are designed to prevent the discharge of pollutants that pass through, interfere with, or are otherwise incompatible with the operation of POTWs. PSES are analogous to BAT effluent limitations for direct dischargers and are generally based on the same factors. The final rule establishes PSES as follows:

·      A zero discharge standard for all pollutants in fly ash transport water, bottom ash transport water, and FGMC wastewater.

·      Numeric standards on mercury, arsenic, selenium, and nitrate/nitrite as N in the discharge of FGD wastewater.

·      Numeric standards on mercury, arsenic, selenium and TDS in the discharge of gasification wastewater.

Pretreatment standards for new sources are also designed to prevent the discharge of any pollutant into a POTW that interferes with, passes through, or is otherwise incompatible with the POTW. PSNS are analogous to NSPS for direct dischargers, and EPA generally considers the same factors for both sets of standards. The final rule establishes PSNS that are the same as the rule’s NSPS.

Did You Like this Article? Get All the Energy Industry News Delivered to Your Inbox

Subscribe to an email newsletter today at no cost and receive the latest news and information.

 Subscribe Now

Whitepapers

The Time is Right for Optimum Reliability: Capital-Intensive Industries and Asset Performance Management

Imagine a plant that is no longer at risk of a random shutdown. Imagine not worrying about losing...

Going Digital: The New Normal in Oil & Gas

In this whitepaper you will learn how Keystone Engineering, ONGC, and Saipem are using software t...

Maximizing Operational Excellence

In a recent survey conducted by PennEnergy Research, 70% of surveyed energy industry professional...

Leveraging the Power of Information in the Energy Industry

Information Governance is about more than compliance. It’s about using your information to drive ...

Latest PennEnergy Jobs

PennEnergy Oil & Gas Jobs