US army looks to increase CHP capability

Secretary of the US Army Eric Fanning has issued a challenge for the Army to commission 50 megawatts of new combined heat and power (CHP) projects annually over the next four years.

CHP makes sense when there is a localized need for both power and thermal energy. There are potentially many locations and situations where the Army could conserve fuel and save energy by installing CHP to create hot water, rather than operating local generators and boilers.


The technology also offers an alternative to the regional electrical grid and can ensure that mission-critical functions on installations are maintained even in the event that access to the regional electrical grid is severed.



At a conference in August in Providence, Fanning said the Army plans to double its CHP production in the next two years, and to triple it in four years.

 



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