Apple plans largest private fuel cell energy project in the US

In keeping with Apple’s (NASDAQ: AAPL) recent clean energy policy, the company has announced that it is to install the largest private fuel cell energy project in America.

A filing with North Carolina's Utilities Commission reveals that Apple's 4.8 MW fuel cell farm at its North Carolina data center will use Bloom Energy's "Bloom Energy Servers," and is set to be the largest of its kind outside of electric company installations

Apple Insider reports that the project, which should be producing energy by the end of 2012.

The hydrogen fuel is set to be produced from natural gas feedstocks, with Apple hoping to offset the use of natural gas with landfill methane gas or other biogas at its Maiden, North Carolina premises. A provider has yet to be announced.

Bloom Boxes are being used for clean energy production by a number of other large tech firms, including Adobe, eBay, and Google.

Apple's project would be ten times larger than Bank of America's 500 kW
Bloom installation in Southern California.

"That's a huge vote of confidence in fuel cells," said James Warner, policy director of the Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Energy Association in Washington.

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